Board of Directors

(June 1, 2018 to May 31, 2020)

Danielle Monfet
President
ÉTS
(Montréal, Québec)
Karine Lavigne
Vice-President
Hydro-Québec
(Shawinigan, Québec)
Andrea Pietila
Secretary
RDH Building Science Inc.
(Toronto, Ontario)
Liam O’Brien
Past-President
Carleton University
(Ottawa, Ontario)
Umberto Berardi Ryerson University
(Toronto, Ontario)
Sebastián Carrizo RWDI
(Toronto, Ontario)
Yuxiang Chen University of Alberta
(Edmonton, Alberta)
Ralph Evans University of Victoria
(Victoria, British Columbia)
Burak Gunay Carleton University
(Ottawa, Ontario)
Eoghan Hayes Edge Sustainability Consulting
(Vancouver, British Columbia)
Trent Hilliard Green Power Labs
(Dartmouth, Nova Scotia)
Ted Kesik University of Toronto
(Toronto, Ontario)
Adam Wills NRC – Construction Research Centre
(Ottawa, Ontario)

Danielle Monfet is an Assistant Professor at the École de technologie supérieure in the department of construction engineering and has a PhD from Concordia University in Building Engineering. Her main research theme is the development of new techniques for evaluating and improving the energy performance of multi-usage buildings. The energy analysis for this type of building is multifactorial and requires an understanding of the interactions between several equipment and systems (envelope systems, mechanical systems, renewable energy systems, etc.). These interactions have to be taken into account during the design and operation and are based on information management using a BIM-BEM-BOM (Building Information Model – Building Energy Model – Building Operation Model) concept. This includes, among other things, an overall approach to improve building performance, the development of frameworks to promote the use of energy simulation tools in the integrated design process and using BIM tools, the development of a feedback methodology where building measured data are used to evaluate the actual performance of innovative concepts during operation and support the use of more realistic modeling and input parameters for the design of future buildings and the development of new models for multi-usages buildings such as a predictive model of exchanges between plants and the indoor environment.

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Karine Lavigne is a researcher and project manager at the Laboratoire des Technologies de l’Énergie (LTE) of Hydro-Quebec Research Institute since 2005. She is actively working to increase the energy efficiency of commercial and institutional buildings though the development of continuous commissioning and energy simulation tools. Karine participated in the development of simulation software “SIMEB” an interface to EnergyPlus and DOE2 energy simulation engines. She published several scientific papers related to the building energy simulation, model calibration and management of power peak demand. Karine completed her undergraduate studies in mechanical engineering and her master degree in mechanical engineering-Latent and Sensible thermal energy storage at the University of Sherbrooke. She is also a member of the Ordre des ingénieurs du Québec.

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Andrea Pietila is currently working as an Energy and Sustainability Analyst at RDH Building Science, working with a team of energy modellers and building enclosure specialists to make buildings better. Andrea’s work at RDH is focused on “buildings that perform” – such as net zero, Passive House, and LEED certified buildings. She works on a variety of building types in the commercial, institutional and residential sectors, and covers both new construction and deep energy retrofit projects. Andrea has a B.Eng and an M.A.Sc. from Carleton University in Ottawa. Her thesis research employed building performance simulation to examine the feasibility of eliminating electrical draws from houses during periods of high demand on the central electrical system, a concept known as “zero peak housing”. Outside of building performance simulation, Andrea likes to play beach volleyball and spikeball, and enjoys concerts and listening to podcasts.

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Liam (William) O’Brien Ph.D., P.Eng. is an associate professor for Carleton University’s Architectural Conservation and Sustainability Engineering program and the principal investigator of the Human Building Interaction Lab. The HBI Lab includes a team of over 10 researchers with diverse backgrounds in civil, mechanical, and electrical engineering, architecture, and psychology, who focus on design and control of energy-efficient buildings, with a specialization in occupant behaviour. Prof. O’Brien has worked with approximately twenty industry and government partners and raised over $2-million in the past five years. He has authored or co-authored over one hundred and twenty peer-reviewed publications and co-edited two books on net-zero energy buildings and occupant research methods. His graduates are professors and researchers in government laboratories and industry R&D departments. He has a wide network of research collaborations due to leadership positions on three International Energy Agency Tasks and three NSERC Strategic Research Networks. Prof. O’Brien is currently the Co-Operating Agent for the five-year, 100-researcher International Energy Agency Annex 79, titled “Occupant-centric building design and operation”. He is heavily involved in the building design and research community, including serving as Past President of the Canadian Chapter of the International Building Performance Simulation Association and Faculty Advisor for ASHRAE. He has chaired multiple academic conferences and symposia, facilitated educational workshops, and given numerous keynote and plenary talks. He has won several prestigious awards including the Carleton Research Achievement Award, Ontario Building Envelope Council Rising Star Award, the Ontario Early Researcher Award, and the International Building Performance Simulation Association (IBPSA) Outstanding Young Contributor Award. 

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Umberto Berardi is a Professor at Ryerson University in Toronto. His main research interests are related to the study of building systems that incorporate new nanotechnologies for improved performance. He has mainly focused on organic PCMs, such as paraffin and bio-PCM, and on granular and monolithic aerogel. Dr. Berardi has an extensive publication record, including over 100 peer-reviewed journals. In terms of research outcome, Dr. Berardi’s publications have received almost 3000 citations in Google Scholar, where he has an h-index of 25. At the International Conference on Applied Energy in 2016 in China, he was awarded as the one of the ten most cited authors worldwide in the field of Applied Energy. Dr. Berardi is the Chair of the conference X IAQVEC 2019. Moreover, he was the International Committee Chair of the International Conference on Sustainable Design, Engineering and Construction – ICSDEC 2016 – in Tempe-Arizona, and the Technical Program and Leadership Committee co-Chair of ICSDEC 2015 in Chicago. Dr. Berardi is the Editor-in-Chief of the Journal Canadian Acoustics, and he has been the editor of several special issues for journals such as Energy and Buildings, Buildings, Sustainability, and Advances in Mechanical Engineering. He is also a member of the editorial board of several journals. His awards include: the Early Research Career Excellence Award, Ryerson University, 2018, the Best Italian Engineer in North America award by the ISSNAF (Italian Scientists and Scholars in North America Foundation) in Washington in 2016; and the Best Technical Award in the NESEA competition by the US Department of in Boston in 2014. Dr. Berardi has a body of funded research comprising over $1.5M in government and private sector sponsored research. In the last two years, he has been awarded a CFI-JELF; NSERC Discovery Grant; Early Research Award from the MRI – Ontario; Building Excellence Research and Education Grants from the BC Housing; OCE-VIP projects; and several NSERC Engages.

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Sebastián Carrizo is an Energy Consultant within RWDI’s high performance buildings group. In Sebastián’s current position at RWDI he works on projects in pursuit of various sustainability and energy objectives, with the majority of his work revolving around: energy analysis and modelling, daylight modelling and analysis, passive design, the Toronto Green Standard, energy incentive coordination, and sustainability. Sebastián holds a B.Eng. from The Intituto Tecnologico de Buenos Aires (Argentina), and an M. Eng. from Carleton University.

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Yuxiang Chen is an assistant professor in the School of Building Science and Engineering, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering of the University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. His research expertise is on high performance buildings, with focuses on energy efficiency and peak demand reduction through thermal energy storage, daylighting, robust controls, utilization of renewable energy, and their integrated design and operation.

He was a core-team member in the design, construction, and performance assessment of several high performance buildings, including an EQuilibrium house “ÉcoTerra”. ÉcoTerra is one of the 12 finalists of a sustainable housing initiative organized by the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC). He was a key researcher in the Industrial Research Chair for “Optimized Operation and Energy Efficiency: towards High Performance Buildings” funded by NSERC and Hydro Québec, before he Joined the University of Alberta in July, 2015. Dr. Chen has participated in the International Energy Agency (IEA) Tasks “Economical Heating and Cooling Systems for Low Energy Houses” and “Towards Net-Zero Energy Buildings”, and is currently involved in another task “Energy Flexible Buildings”. He has been affiliated with Canada’s leading high performance buildings research group, Smart Net-Zero Energy Buildings Strategic Network (SNEBRN), for several years.

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Ralph Evins is an Assistant Professor at the University of Victoria, leading a group investigating the application of computational techniques (simulation, optimization, machine learning) to energy use in cities (buildings and urban energy systems). Current projects include the use of machine learning in data-driven building control and the development of an online portal for energy systems optimization. Ralph completed an MEng in Civil and Environment Engineering at Imperial College London, then an Engineering Doctorate on “Multi-objective optimisation as an aid to design space exploration for low-carbon buildings” at the University of Bristol, UK, together with the industry partner Buro Happold. After this he was a post-doctoral researcher then Group Leader at the Urban Energy Systems laboratory at Empa / ETH Zurich in Switzerland, leading development of the Holistic Urban Energy Simulation platform for the ‘Future Energy Efficient Buildings and Districts’ project. He is a Chartered Engineer with CIBSE and an IBPSA-World Projects Committee member.

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Burak Gunay is an Assistant Professor at Carleton University in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. His research examines methods to optimize the operation of commercial buildings for comfort and energy use. He uses the operational data gathered inside modern automation and control networks to learn from the occupants’ comfort, behaviour, and presence patterns. Using operational data, he employs inverse modelling to characterize building equipment operation and the envelope performance. Aside from field-scale data analyses, his research commonly uses building performance simulation.

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Eoghan Hayes is a Principal at Edge Sustainability Consulting located in the Vancouver area, British Columbia.

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Trent Hilliard Ph.D. P. Eng. works at Green Power Labs on technologies that use advanced weather forecasts as an input for predictive control of buildings to save energy, cost, GHG emissions, or all 3 simultaneously depending on the jurisdiction. His interests include the use of building simulation, sensor information, and other modeling tools such as artificial intelligence to provide smarter controls to buildings. These controls help reduce energy consumption and demand while maintaining or enhancing occupant comfort. The end result is happier occupants due to increased comfort, and happier owners due to minimized energy costs and a positive impact on the environment.

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Ted Kesik is a professor of building science in the John H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape and Design at the University of Toronto with a career focus on the integration of professional practice, research and teaching. He entered the construction industry in 1974 and has since gained extensive experience in various aspects of building enclosure design, energy modeling, quality assurance, commissioning, performance verification, and building systems integration. Professor Kesik’s research interests include resilience, sustainability, durability, high performance buildings, life cycle assessment and building performance simulation. He is also associated with the Green Roof Innovation Testing Laboratory (gritlab) at U of T where he has guided research on modeling the cooling effects of green roofs/walls on buildings. His current research involves the development of design guidelines for low-carbon buildings that are resilient and sustainable within the context of climate change. Dr. Kesik continues to practice as a consulting engineer to leading architectural offices, forward thinking enterprises and progressive government agencies. He remains actively involved in technical organizations and is the author of numerous books, studies, reports and articles related to his areas of research and professional practice.

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Adam Wills is a Research Council Officer at the National Research Council Canada – Construction Research Centre. His current research is focused on simulation of new and existing residential building stock to explore impacts of potential changes to the National Building Code, and to provide technical feedback to building code committees. Analysis is conducted using the Housing Technology Assessment Platform developed by CanmetENERGY-Ottawa, and ESP-r. Adam received his undergraduate degree in mechanical engineering at the University of Windsor, and a MASc and PhD at Carleton University. His master’s research used co-simulation of ESP-r and TRNSYS to evaluate the technical feasibility of residential seasonal solar thermal systems in Canadian homes. His PhD research used the Canadian Hybrid Residential End-Use Energy and GHG Emissions Model (CHREM) and particle swarm optimization to study cost-optimal retrofit solutions for converting existing residential communities to net-zero.

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