Board of Directors

(June 1, 2016 to May 31, 2018)

Liam O’Brien
President
Carleton University
(Ottawa, Ontario)
Trent Hilliard Dalhousie University
(Halifax, Nova Scotia)
Lukas Swan Dalhousie University
(Halifax, Nova Scotia)
Jeff Blake CanmetENERGY, Natural Resources Canada
(Oakville & Ottawa, Ontario)
Burak Gunay
Secretary
Carleton University
(Ottawa, Ontario)
Danielle Monfet
Vice President
ÉTS
(Montréal, Québec)
Azam Khan Autodesk
(Toronto, Ontario)
Ted Kesik University of Toronto
(Toronto, Ontario)
Bojan Andjelkovic BC Hydro
(Vancouver, British Columbia)
Karine Lavigne Hydro-Québec
(Shawinigan, Québec)
Alan Fung
Treasurer
Ryerson University
(Toronto, Ontario)
Yuxiang Chen University of Alberta
(Edmonton, Alberta)
Sebastián Carrizo RWDI
(Toronto, Ontario)

Liam (William) O’Brien, PhD, PEng is an associate professor and program advisor for Carleton University’s Architectural Conservation and Sustainability Engineering program and the principal investigator of the Human Building Interaction Lab. The HBI Lab is a team of about 10 researchers with diverse backgrounds in civil, mechanical, and electrical engineering, architecture, and psychology. Their research areas including understanding and modelling occupant behaviour, comfort in offices and homes, and advanced adaptive controls. He is currently a subtask co-leader for IEA EBC Annex 66 on “Definition and Simulation of Occupant Behaviour in Buildings”. Liam has won several research awards and has published over 60 peer-reviewed papers. He has also worked on about a dozen consulting projects ranging from building design to occupant engagement strategies.

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Trent Hilliard is a Ph.D. student under the supervision of Dr. Lukas Swan in the Renewable Energy Storage Lab, part of the Mechanical Engineering department at Dalhousie University. His Ph.D. work looks at the use of advanced weather forecasts as an input for predictive control of buildings to save energy, cost, GHG emissions, or all 3 simultaneously depending on the jurisdiction. He has a Diploma of Engineering from St. Francis Xavier University, his B.Eng and M.A.Sc. from Dalhousie University, and holds Nova Scotia Research and Innovation Graduate Scholarship and ACENet Fellowship in support of his research efforts.

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Lukas Swan, PhD, PEng, is an assistant professor of Mechanical Engineering at Dalhousie University where he directs the Renewable Energy Storage Laboratory and lectures on topics of the same. He is involved with both R&D and commercial aspects of a broad array of renewable and alternative energy technologies. His passion is sustainable and efficient energy generation, storage, and conversion mechanisms, with the intent of displacing conventional fossil fuel use. Dr. Swan and his research group focus their objectives on developing energy storage technologies and management methods to allow for the increased integration of renewable energy with the electricity grid. The group conducts commercial and residential building energy performance simulation for research of new model predictive control strategies and peak electricity demand analysis. The majority of their applied research is conducted with collaborating industry partners, and is immediately employed in technical and business decisions. Dr. Swan received his BSc at California Polytechnic (Cal Poly SLO) and both his MASc and PhD from Dalhousie University in Nova Scotia. He lives in Lawrencetown Beach with his wife and two young sons.

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Jeff Blake is a registered professional engineer in the province of Ontario with experience in building energy simulation and analysis, building energy conservation and building simulation software development. His career in the building industry started with co-op work for a mid-sized building design/specification firm and quickly moved from doing “hand calculations” for HVAC equipment sizing and selection to automating the procedures on the first PCs in the marketplace. As an early developer of building energy analysis software (BESA – Building Energy Systems Analysis that replaced the widely used Meriwether programs in the early eighties) to the management and development of today’s Canadian building energy performance tools (HOT2000, HOT3000, EE4, CAN-Quest, etc.), Mr. Blake has remained a strong proponent of ever-improving software tools for Canadian building researchers, designers and practitioners. Mr. Blake has spent most of his career working for small engineering firms in the private sector but currently works in the Canadian Federal government for Natural Resources Canada as a project leader for the Simulation Tools team within the Sustainable Building and Communities Group. Mr. Blake is a past-president of IBPSA-Canada and a staunch supporter of the association since its inception in 2001.

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Burak Gunay is an Assistant Professor at Carleton University in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. His research examines methods to optimize the operation of commercial buildings for comfort and energy use. He uses the operational data gathered inside modern automation and control networks to learn from the occupants’ comfort, behaviour, and presence patterns. Using operational data, he employs inverse modelling to characterize building equipment operation and the envelope performance. Aside from field-scale data analyses, his research commonly uses building performance simulation.

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Danielle Monfet is an Assistant Professor at the École de technologie supérieure in the department of construction engineering. She has an undergraduate degree in mechanical engineering and a MASc and PhD in building engineering that included the development of calibrated energy simulation models and the development of a new methodology to perform ongoing commissioning. Her research interest includes the development of new techniques to assess and improve energy performance during building operation. Recently, she has been working on various subjects related to energy performance such as energy prediction, calibration of building energy models, self-correction algorithms of heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems, improving the use of building energy simulation during design and during building operation as well as energy simulation in relation to Building Information Models (BIM).

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Azam Khan is Director, Complex Systems Research at Autodesk. He is the Founder of the Parametric Human Project Consortium, SimAUD: the Symposium on Simulation for Architecture and Urban Design, and the CHI Sustainability Community. He is also a Founding Member of the International Society for Human Simulation and has been the Velux Guest Professor at The Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts, School of Architecture, at the Center for IT and Architecture (CITA) in Copenhagen, Denmark.

Azam received his B.Sc. and M.Sc. in Computer Science at the University of Toronto and Ph.D. in Computer Science at the University of Copenhagen. He has published over 50 articles in simulation, human-computer interaction, architectural design, sensor networks, and sustainability. His Toronto team is currently developing a new experimental simulator to explore big simulation as a component of eScience, and his New York team performs award winning design research in advanced architectural projects.

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Ted Kesik is a professor of building science in the John H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape and Design at the University of Toronto. He completed his undergraduate studies in civil engineering at the University of Ottawa in 1983, followed by graduate studies at the University of Toronto from 1983 to 1992. In 1986 he was licensed as a professional engineer and has maintained practice in the areas of building science, building systems integration and landscape infrastructure. Dr. Kesik joined the Daniels Faculty in 1999 where he now teaches in the Architecture and Landscape programs, conducting research and supporting graduate students.

Professor Kesik’s research interests include building envelope performance and durability, life cycle assessment, solar buildings and sustainability. Currently, Dr. Kesik is concluding his final segment of research within the Solar Buildings Research Network, a 5-year program involving 11 Canadian universities funded by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council. Professor Kesik is the author of a comprehensive cost-benefit study of the Toronto Green Standard and also co-authored the Tower Renewal Guidelines as part of a collaborative research project examining building envelope retrofits of 1960s to 1980s concrete high-rise apartment buildings. He is also affiliated with urban sustainability research projects being conducted through the University of Toronto’s Cities Centre. Most recently, Dr. Kesik helped form a team at the Centre for Landscape Research that is establishing a photovoltaic/green roof testing laboratory and protocol to optimize the performance of these symbiotic technologies.

Dr. Kesik continues to practice as a consulting engineer to leading architectural offices and progressive government agencies. He is also involved in the development and delivery of continuing education for architects and engineers. Professor Kesik is actively involved in technical organizations and is the author of numerous books, studies, reports and articles related to his areas of research and professional practice.

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Bojan Andjelkovic is a specialist engineer in BC Hydro Conservation and Energy Management Engineering and main technical reviewer of building energy modeling studies for the BC Hydro Power Smart New Construction Program. He has over 22 years of building design, engineering and building performance modeling experience, both locally and internationally. With effective working knowledge of several building performance modeling software packages, CFD and energy analysis programs, he has completed numerous modeling studies for broad variety of building projects. As a BC Hydro’s technical lead in new construction field, he was instrumental in development and acted as technical monitor of several building industry guidelines and research projects. Bojan is a registered Professional Engineer in British Columbia, LEED Accredited Professional, Certified Energy Manager and High-Performance Building Design Professional.

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Karine Lavigne is a researcher and project manager at the Laboratoire des Technologies de l’Énergie (LTE) of Hydro-Quebec Research Institute since 2005. She is actively working to increase the energy efficiency of commercial and institutional buildings though the development of continuous commissioning and energy simulation tools. Karine participated in the development of simulation software “SIMEB” an interface to EnergyPlus and DOE2 energy simulation engines. She published several scientific papers related to the building energy simulation, model calibration and management of power peak demand. Karine completed her undergraduate studies in mechanical engineering and her master degree in mechanical engineering-Latent and Sensible thermal energy storage at the University of Sherbrooke. She is also a member of the Ordre des ingénieurs du Québec.

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Alan Fung is Principal Investigator for the Ryerson Centre for Urban Energy (CUE) research on the development of residential HVAC and air conditioning demand management and control systems.  With a PhD in Mechanical Engineering from Dalhousie University, Dr. Fung is an Associate Professor at Ryerson and Adjunct Professor at Dalhousie University where he co-founded and was manager of the Canadian Residential Energy End-Use Data and Analysis Centre (CREEDAC) from 1995 to 2005. Dr. Fung has more than 15 years of experience in energy research, and oversees a vigorous research program on sustainable building integrated energy systems/net-zero energy buildings and fuel cell based advanced power generation systems.

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Yuxiang Chen is an assistant professor in the School of Building Science and Engineering, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering of the University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. His research expertise is on high performance buildings, with focuses on energy efficiency and peak demand reduction through thermal energy storage, daylighting, robust controls, utilization of renewable energy, and their integrated design and operation.

He was a core-team member in the design, construction, and performance assessment of several high performance buildings, including an EQuilibrium house “ÉcoTerra”. ÉcoTerra is one of the 12 finalists of a sustainable housing initiative organized by the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (CMHC). He was a key researcher in the Industrial Research Chair for “Optimized Operation and Energy Efficiency: towards High Performance Buildings” funded by NSERC and Hydro Québec, before he Joined the University of Alberta in July, 2015. Dr. Chen has participated in the International Energy Agency (IEA) Tasks “Economical Heating and Cooling Systems for Low Energy Houses” and “Towards Net-Zero Energy Buildings”, and is currently involved in another task “Energy Flexible Buildings”. He has been affiliated with Canada’s leading high performance buildings research group, Smart Net-Zero Energy Buildings Strategic Network (SNEBRN), for several years.

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Sebastián Carrizo is a Technical Coordinator within RWDI’s high performance buildings group. In Sebastián’s current position at RWDI he works on projects in pursuit of various sustainability and energy objectives, with the majority of his work revolving around: energy analysis and modelling, daylight modelling and analysis, passive design, the Toronto Green Standard, energy incentive coordination, and sustainability.

Sebastián holds a B.Eng. from The Intituto Tecnologico de Buenos Aires (Argentina), and an M. Eng. from Carleton University.

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